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Lughnasadh or Lammas in February

If you are part of the green revolution and have a yard or allotment, then you are probably harvesting corn round about now.
We have such a rich history with corn and grain as humans domesticated teosintes to maize  some 6000 years ago. A tradition has evolved with harvesting corn and grain, where we celebrate the good things in our lives.

I know I am not alone in revering the earth as sacred. It is important to remember how we physically depend upon the land for food. The soil sustains our existence and so to treat ourselves with respect, we must start with the living earth beneath our feet.

With this celebration of our good yields, a theme of fairness runs through this time of harvest and distribution. Sharing our harvest with others by having a communal meal is one way to celebrate the corn harvest. Traditionally, a loaf baked in the shape of a ringed braid or a sheaf of corn is shared and includes a thanksgiving element. Sharing and thanksgiving can also be celebrated by volunteering time or money to charitable work.

We can acknowledge and bring awareness to the environmental damage from pollution and irresponsible farming methods that compromise nature’s balance and future harvests. This festival provides an opportunity to metaphorically separate the wheat from the chaff and symbolically rid ourselves from things that are no longer needed. Let’s consider what we might do to ensure that future harvests are uncontaminated and equally distributed.

Unicorn Cafe wishes you a fruitfuil harvest and is thankful for your continued support. 

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