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Cinnfull Pancakes

 Ingredients

 

  • 150g cake flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil of your choice and oil for frying
  • 5 tablespoons water
  • 300ml soy milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup

Directions

Sift together the flour, baking powder, salt and cinnamon
In a separate bowl, combine all the other ingredients
Add the wet mixture to the dry mixture and mix until just combined. A few lumps is ok. Overmixing will make the pancakes rubbery
Let the mixture stand for 10 minutes or covered overnight in the refrigerator. If the mixture looks too thick, you can add a little water to reconstitute it
Oil a large, heavy non stick or cast iron pan and preheat over medium-high heat for about 2 minutes. A very thin coating of oil is sufficient.
Using the same amount of batter in your ladle/baster/cup at a time, pour the batter out with a slightly circular motion so that it spreads evenly in the pan
Cook the pancakes until brown on the bottom and bubbles form on top.Turn the pancakes over and cook until the bottoms are browned and the pancake is firm to the touch.
Repeat with the remaining batter , adding more oil to the pan as needed
Serve with a topping of your choice. I like mine with syrup and coconut cream.
This makes about 10 x 10cm pancakes

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Unicorn Cafe August 2017 Update

It’s August now and we have passed the imaginary halfway mark of Winter, to state the obvious. We got a taste of digital advertising and ran our first Google and Facebook adverts. While we hoped for more reaction,  it was still great to get our name out there.

For those of you who made enquiries about our shop: we almost secured a temporary space in Woodstock, but unfortunately we’re back to the drawing board. We were excited at the prospect of  a space in which you can browse through our products, eat our freshly made food and experience human contact, so naturally we are as disappointed as you are.  However, we are now more determined than ever to keep looking for a home. We acknowledge your wishes to visit our space and we’re determined to secure a venue, even if it is small, as soon as possible. Our vision is to be in a large, dynamic, multi-usable space, so hang on to that idea with us as we make the journey there.

We have been wanting to run an article called Understanding Climate Change for quite some time, and for a number of reasons. One would be that it can be a terribly confusing topic with many different aspects, and often climate denialists pay people to share stories that are misleading and contradictory. It is important for us to understand what is happening to our home planet without it being a daunting process. Scientific equations and terms can be off-putting for the layman, and we want to be able to explain what it is without losing your attention.

Our research process has turned out to be an enormous task and we have fallen into a number of rabbit holes trying to understand the science of planetary boundaries. We will continue our mission on this interesting and necessary topic, so keep a look-out for it in our future newsletters.

You can now buy moringa oil, pendant diffusers, room diffusers, biodegradable earbuds, Himalayan salt, epsom salts (magnesium sulphate), and frozen meals at our online store.

We are working on adding more items at a quicker pace in order to build our variety of eco-friendly products.

Thank you for your support. We are honoured to continue to provide you with our ethical services and products.

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Gardening Tips for July

July is not really a planting month for vegetables, but you can still plant :

– Beetroot seeds
– Cape Gooseberry seeds in seed trays
– Cauliflower seeds
-Celery seeds
– Mint seeds
– Mustard greens/Cress seeds
– Pea seeds
– Potatoes
– Radish seeds
– Shallot seedlings
– Swedes/Rutabagas seeds
– Tomato seedlings
– Turnip seeds

Now is a good time to start planning your summer garden early in the month so you have enough time to source and purchase open pollinated seeds for early sowing.

Carry out soil tests, particularly on land where growth for one or more seasons has been poor.

After winter crops have been removed, dig the ground well over and incorporate dressings of organic matter.

Broad beans can be side dressed, earthed up and given support with string or wire if required.

In mild conditions, tomatoes can be sowed in seed boxes.

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Collecting Rainwater

If you have a corrugated metal or tiled roof, you can harvest a great deal of water. To give you an example, a 100m2 roof can collect 450 litres of water in 5mm of rainfall. Cape Town receives on average about 788mm of rainfall a year. When we put that number into the calculator for our little 100m2 roof, that amounts to 70,920 litres of water. The numbers are huge – why miss out on such an opportunity? There are rainwater collection calculators on the web, one of which can be found here.

The first place to start, is to buy the tank or tanks.The bigger the better, but affordability and space should influence your decision as well as how much water you consume and what you will be using the rainwater for. You can buy cylindrical tanks, both thin or wide. Some go underground and some are rectangular and would fit snugly against a wall. We came across three easily available brands, Eco tanks, Jojo, and Nel. The prices and quality differ. We picked 2 x 2500 litre beige Eco upright tanks.

The next thing to consider when installing the tank, is where the downpipe leads from off the roof gutters. It will be easier to install if the tank can stand there safely and not obstruct anything. If it is not the ideal spot, you may want investigate the option of diverting the water down a new downpipe in a better position.

All you will need is piping to the tank. When the tank fills, it will become very heavy. A 2500 litre tank will weigh 2.5 tons when it is full, so making sure you have a proper foundation is necessary. We luckily had paving in our spot so we did not need to build a foundation. However, a foundation can be built easily enough with the right tools.

To make the foundation you will need to know the size of your tank. By sketching a diagram of your tank to scale, you will be able to determine the size of the square foundation beneath it by drawing a square or rectangle with the tank’s shape inside. This will lead you to the length of four wooden planks that must be bought to hold the cement mix you will make. Start by levelling and compacting the ground where the tank will be. Once complete, assemble the boards  to make a square or rectangle to contain your cement slab.You will need to get a bag of cement mix and sand, and mix it up and fill the slab container. Scrape it out evenly using a level and ensure that it is in fact level. The cement will dry and you can remove the boards or not. You can place your tank/s on the slab. Secure your tank by tying it to the ground with wire. Don’t make this too tight as the stability of your tank may be compromised. As big as tanks are, they can blow about in the wind. We have not tied ours down, we just make sure there is enough water inside to keep them from moving. Connect the downpipe to the tank. You may want to put a fitted filter at the opening or into a catchment pipe as shown in these pictures.

 

This picture has a fancy split which is not necessary. You could even use netted fabric and secure the fabric to the opening with elastic or rope. A filter will keep out leaves and other debris and also keep mosquitos from entering the tank and breeding in the water. Remember that installing a tank doesn’t have to be a fancy affair. If you are harvesting rainwater, you are doing it right. Look at the extras as frills.

Here is another picture to give you ideas.

The next thing you need is a tap or ball valve, some connections, plumber’s tape, and piping to divert the overflow to a place of your choice. You can divert the overflow either into the stormwater drain or even better, into another tank. We went to the hardware store and gave them the fitting size of the tank, and the store assistant helped us get all the fittings to connect to the ball valve we used and the fitting from the ball valve to the hosepipe. It’s all a bit like lego, finding what fits on what. You basically want the water outlet to also connect to a hosepipe. This picture will give you some dos and don’ts on how to assemble piping if you choose to use your water elsewhere, or put it in an irrigation system.

The system we installed, as explained above, is called the dry system, and water comes from the downpipes and straight into the tank. When the rain stops, the pipes will run dry.

There is also the wet system, which allows for the tank to be positioned further away from the roof gutters and uses the principle that water will always find a level.The pipes remain ‘charged’ so that when it rains, water will flow into the tank.

COLLECTING RAINWATER

If you have a corrugated metal or tiled roof, you can harvest a great deal of water. To give you an example, a 100m2 roof can collect 450 litres of water in 5mm of rainfall. Cape Town receives on average about 788mm of rainfall a year. When we put that number into the calculator for our little 100m2 roof, that amounts to 70,920 litres of water. The numbers are huge – why miss out on such an opportunity? There are rainwater collection calculators on the web, one of which can be found here.

The first place to start, is to buy the tank or tanks.The bigger the better, but affordability and space should influence your decision as well as how much water you consume and what you will be using the rainwater for. You can buy cylindrical tanks, both thin or wide. Some go underground and some are rectangular and would fit snugly against a wall. We came across three easily available brands, Eco tanks, Jojo, and Nel. The prices and quality differ. We picked 2 x 2500 litre beige Eco upright tanks.

The next thing to consider when installing the tank, is where the downpipe leads from off the roof gutters. It will be easier to install if the tank can stand there safely and not obstruct anything. If it is not the ideal spot, you may want investigate the option of diverting the water down a new downpipe in a better position.

All you will need is piping to the tank. When the tank fills, it will become very heavy. A 2500 litre tank will weigh 2.5 tons when it is full, so making sure you have a proper foundation is necessary. We luckily had paving in our spot so we did not need to build a foundation. However, a foundation can be built easily enough with the right tools.

To make the foundation you will need to know the size of your tank. By sketching a diagram of your tank to scale, you will be able to determine the size of the square foundation beneath it by drawing a square or rectangle with the tank’s shape inside. This will lead you to the length of four wooden planks that must be bought to hold the cement mix you will make. Start by levelling and compacting the ground where the tank will be. Once complete, assemble the boards  to make a square or rectangle to contain your cement slab.You will need to get a bag of cement mix and sand, and mix it up and fill the slab container. Scrape it out evenly using a level and ensure that it is in fact level. The cement will dry and you can remove the boards or not. You can place your tank/s on the slab. Secure your tank by tying it to the ground with wire. Don’t make this too tight as the stability of your tank may be compromised. As big as tanks are, they can blow about in the wind. We have not tied ours down, we just make sure there is enough water inside to keep them from moving. Connect the downpipe to the tank. You may want to put a fitted filter at the opening or into a catchment pipe as shown in these pictures.

This picture has a fancy split which is not necessary. You could even use netted fabric and secure the fabric to the opening with elastic or rope. A filter will keep out leaves and other debris and also keep mosquitos from entering the tank and breeding in the water. Remember that installing a tank doesn’t have to be a fancy affair. If you are harvesting rainwater, you are doing it right. Look at the extras as frills.

Here is another picture to give you ideas.

The next thing you need is a tap or ball valve, some connections, plumber’s tape, and piping to divert the overflow to a place of your choice. You can divert the overflow either into the stormwater drain or even better, into another tank. We went to the hardware store and gave them the fitting size of the tank, and the store assistant helped us get all the fittings to connect to the ball valve we used and the fitting from the ball valve to the hosepipe. It’s all a bit like lego, finding what fits on what. You basically want the water outlet to also connect to a hosepipe. This picture will give you some dos and don’ts on how to assemble piping if you choose to use your water elsewhere, or put it in an irrigation system.

The system we installed, as explained above, is called the dry system, and water comes from the downpipes and straight into the tank. When the rain stops, the pipes will run dry.

There is also the wet system, which allows for the tank to be positioned further away from the roof gutters and uses the principle that water will always find a level.The pipes remain ‘charged’ so that when it rains, water will flow into the tank.

There is also the transfer system where the tank can be situated anywhere on the property and uses a pump to pump water from an underground pit into the tank.

We hope we have given you some good ideas on how to collect your own rainwater. The dry system is really easy and you will be able to do it yourself.

Here are some other tips to remember when collecting rainwater:

Check your leaf eater or filter regularly and if you have tall trees close to the house, you may need to clean the roof gutters every now and then.

Ensure that the overflow is away from the base – you don’t want your foundation compromised.

Make sure that the opening is sealed or that you have a filter in place so bugs can’t get in.

To stop anything from growing inside, the tank should not allow any light inside.  Algae are little plants and with light, they will grow in your container.

Your rainwater system does not need to be expensive. You can even use old jacuzzis, water barrels, or any big container you can find. Don’t be put off by underground systems and cisterns etc. Make a start and if you really want the fancy frills, you can add them later. It is better to harvest cheaply than not to harvest rainwater at all.

Don’t choke the flow. It may be a better option to get a big ball valve rather than a small insipid tap. Trickling water can become annoying when you are trying to water the garden.

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Modern Morality

 

MODERN MORALITY

Morality is commonly understood to entail principles that help us to distinguish between right and wrong, or good and bad behaviour. It’s a fluid concept, vastly influenced by cultures and eras. We now live in an information age with information technology advancing exponentially. Computers and the internet have revolutionised communication, and information processes have become a driving force of social evolution. We are, in fact facing an information explosion, and as data availbility increases, so do data management challenges. Within this turbulent sea of knowledge, it’s easy for inaccurate data to masquerade as the truth. This is why information must be constantly checked for accuracy, and false information must be challenged.

Despite it’s daunting volumes, this information does put humans in a better position than ever before to make up their own minds about what is right and wrong. I’m not implying that your parents were wrong when they raised you. They probably told you things like stealing is bad and sharing is good. However, they mostly learnt these morals by what was taught to them by the society they lived in, and they did not have access to the kind of information we have today. Years ago, slavery was an acceptable norm and only when people started questioning whether it was right, did things change. It’s a hard fact to accept that not so long ago, women were not allowed to vote. The first country that allowed women to vote was New Zealand in 1893, and the most recent country was Kuwait in 2005. America allowed women to vote in 1920 and England granted women the vote in 1928. This gives you an idea of how slow positive change can happen – powerful and influential countries like America and Britain only changed this policy less than 100 years ago. We still have a long way to go.

We continue to question our daily living, and here we are in an age of capitalism where most of us know how to lead ethical lives. Yet we live in a society that has become so used to convenience – especially the middle and upper classes – that making the right choices require more effort. Not only does leading a good life require more effort, but it also exposes the individual to ridicule, slander and negative comments by those who are still in denial or who haven’t connected the dots between their daily life and what they perceive to be right.

Let me give you a detailed example. Let’s say someone sends you an e-mail about a petition to act against the palm oil industry because it’s causing massive virgin deforestation and orangutans, amongst many other forest inhabitants, are losing their habitat and being abused, or starving to death. Furthermore, locals of that area were being taken advantage of by the large corporations exploiting them. And so the list of atrocities goes on. For the ordinary person with an average amount of empathy, this is a no-brainer – they sign the petition.

But, for a lot of people, that’s where their concern ends. It’s different ball game if you really have to take action. You may receive another e-mail asking you to pledge to never buy products containing palm oil, or to check first whether the palm oil is certified sustainable. Easier said than done. For instance, you go to your local grocery store for the usual shopping routine. Let’s say you start at the bakery section. You buy your bread like you always do, except this time, you start checking the ingredients. As you read label after label, you realise that every single type of bread on the shelves has palm oil in it, and there is no indication that the companies who used the palm oil acquired it ethically.

Now what do you do? You could just resign yourself to the fact that doing the right thing in this case was too much of an effort and that government or the organisations fighting against the injustices of the palm oil industry must do something about it. You probably have children to feed, so you just buy the bread and maybe make a mental note to support palm oil-free bread if you ever come across it.

But, another option for those who don’t like to give up too easily, is to ask – at the risk of feeling humiliated or petty in front of other customers waiting for service at the bread counter – whether there is palm oil in the freshly baked bread. When the answer is ‘no’, you could feel a minor victory and so you buy the freshly baked bread, feeling content because you did your bit for the greater good. (That is, until you get home to make your lunch, realise the bread is not sliced, and end up eating sandwiches that look like doorstoppers at work the next day.)

This is not over yet, so bear with me here.

You may have signed many petitions or been alerted to some other unsavoury problems by social media, like beaches that are littered with washed-up plastic, or child slavery that is rife in the coffee and chocolate industry, or Nestlé being responsible for river dumping and a host of other unethical business practices. And so it goes on. You push your trolley onward to complete the list of things you need to buy and, as you pass the children’s toys, it suddenly occurs to you how much plastic there is there. Some of you may ask yourselves, where will this plastic end up when the child gets tired of the toy? Will it be recycled? Will it end up in a landfill? Will it get thrown out the car window on a vacation trip?

You need coffee. You look at the all the packaging and nothing indicates that no-one was treated unfairly during the process of getting the beans off the tree and to the grocery store you are now in. You want to buy rusks and notice that they all, too, contain palm oil, and at this stage you are getting tired of reading labels. This mission you have undertaken to do the right thing is impossible, and since you work long hours and barely have enough time to yourself, you realise that making this all from scratch at home would be torturous. And so you give up. It’s not your fault after all. It’s the government’s fault or it is the fault of the big company that made that product, and you can only hope that some organisation like Greenpeace or Friends of the Earth will do something about it.

But let’s look at this more closely. We have become so used to the convenience of pushing our trolleys down the isles of grocery stores that it seems inconceivable to do our shopping another way. Perhaps we should ask ourselves whether other options are actually available and whether we have tried looking for them. Did you use a Google search? Did you join a relevant Facebook group and post a question to the right people? Did you write to the store or speak to the manager? If we all did one or some of these things, then surely there would be better options?

People have become so busy in their personal lives, trying to keep up with work, chores, administration, social media and finding relaxation time, that we do many things in autopilot mode, without slowing down and actually asking ourselves the question, “Is what I am doing, right?” Giving money to a company that tests on animals or steals land from tribes is not the right thing to do. You are using your purchasing power to make that company stronger.

Those companies that monopolise industry have currency in the millions to run ad campaigns to play on your emotions, give you the impression that you need their product, and that it’s as ethical as the mother’s love portrayed in the advert. It’s a big ask to get people to see through all that marketing propaganda and make the effort to support more ethical options.

We’re a product of a society that loves to tell us how to live, what kind of careers to choose, what to eat, how to behave, and when to get married and procreate. The average person accepts this path as the done thing without giving alternative options much thought. We are raised in a society where we get different people to do different jobs, and where we outsource just about everything. Someone else will always do the job that needs to get done.

The change, and real power to make a difference for the better, comes from those who think for themselves. Who evaluate actions from a new perspective, not from the habitual thoughts and acceptance of the old way of doing things. We can no longer leave the mess or injustices for others to clean up and challenge. We need to start with ourselves: being the only person with a higher sensitivity to moral implications can be a tiring task, but when more and more people start questioning and reasoning and taking some form of objection, then things will start tipping in the right direction.

We’ve ended up in the labour-enslaved, greedy and destructive mess that we are in by just following the norm and doing what we are told. Climate change is starting to rear it’s big ugly head, and people are already having to evacuate their homes. And this is only the beginning. If we continue to live in denial and avoid reality, we are in for a serious rollercoaster ride. If we don’t change, it may be too late to make a difference for our children. Always stop and think. Know that, although you feel very isolated in your quest to make the right choices, you are not alone; courtesy of this amazing information age we live in, we can find others like ourselves and be offered support on our journey to a well-lived life.

So where does one start? Here are some pointers:

Open up the boundaries of your respect – You don’t have to only respect the elderly and give them a seat on the bus; you can offer your consideration for so much more. Respect the person of another race, class or religion. Respect the wildlife, respect the environment, respect all the animals and do not objectify them.

Don’t stop learning – Keep reading, stay informed and question everything. As I said previously, with an information overload, there is inaccurate information out there. Study the basics of science and develop a filtering system. There are even books and websites to give you the skills to do this. Use them – they will empower you with the wonderful asset of not being easily fooled. A great and entertaining book to start off with, is Bad Science, written by Ben Goldacre. Be open to hard truths; it’s not always going to be a positive experience, but keep an open mind. If you are unsure, do research and ask questions. Don’t make assumptions. The foundations of your belief system may be compromised but it will make you a better person to decide for yourself, rationally, what is right and what is wrong.

Ask yourself whether you are doing your part to influence good over evil – I am not talking about carrying holy water around with you. Have you volunteered for an organisation that is fighting for positive change? Are you making an effort to buy ethically produced goods? Don’t leave the world’s problems to someone else to fix. Do your part and do it often, even if it is a small objection here and there.

Be truthful and use your voice – Be open to positive criticism. See and say things as they are. Find your truth and live it. Without it, you will most likely end up a miserable person.

Empower yourself by becoming independent – You may have a job, pay the rent, put food on the table ,and even have some money left over. But how independent are you really? Do you have an anxiety attack if your house runs out of power? I’m talking about not needing a government or the services of another. It’s impossible to be totally self-reliant; we will all need a doctor at some time, or advice or help of some sort. But the notion of trying to do things yourself will make you stronger. You are more capable than you think. When you can do many things on your own, you have the power to survive when things go south. This may take some time, but it will be rewarding and excellent for your self-confidence. Ultimately, when you are more independent, you’re in a better position to do things the right way without being told what to do.

 

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Smoked V-Salmon Pieces

 

These are great if you are allergic to fish, or if you love salmon but eat a plant-based diet. It adds a new dimension to salads, pizzas, pastas, and is a must-have ingredient if you make your own sushi. Smoked V-Salmon pieces are best friends with avocado and make a wonderful pair to put on savoury biscuits or even toast. These jars are packed tightly to the brim and a little goes a long way. They come in three sizes: 120ml for R45; 250ml for R82 and 290ml for R95. To order click here

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Easy Peasy Pea Soup

Ingredients

  • 15ml canola oil
  • 3 or 4 onions depending on the size
  • salt
  • pepper
  • 3 or 4 Bay leaves
  • 5ml – 10ml crushed garlic – optional
  • 1 litre boiling water
  • 500g packet of split peas
  • 4 medium potatoes pealed and quatered
  • 10ml of soy sauce

Directions

Fry the onions in the oil over medium heat until they are translucent, not brown
Add salt, pepper and bay leaves, optional garlic and stir
Add 1 litre of boiling water, split peas and cut potatoes, stir and let it simmer for 20 minutes or until peas and potatoes are soft
Remove the bay leaves and add the soy sauce
Mash the contents of the pot using either a potato masher or a food processor for a more smooth consistency
Your soup is ready to serve!

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Unicorn Cafe July 2017 Update

 

If you are reading this, you’ve survived the storm. Well done. For some of us, it was a bit windy. For others, it filled rain tanks and, for some South Africans, tragedy struck. A lot of us made jokes about the storm’s predicted severity, some thought others were over-reacting, and then there were Knysna residents walking on the beach with their pets and belongings, watching  entire neighbourhoods burn down.

You never really know what to expect, and although we have amazing meteorologists who give us great forecasts, you can’t really determine what exactly will happen, because storms can be erratic. One can prepare for the worst and hope for the best. One could go a step further and harvest the heavy rainfall that comes with such a storm. This really seems like the way to go, considering the drought in the Western Cape. Climate change is going to make dry areas drier, so being able to store a few thousand litres of water to grow your plants in summer is essential.

We managed to connect our rainwater tanks just before the big storm hit Cape Town and collected about 1000 litres of water overnight. We will share what we learnt about that further down below.

I enjoy cooking, but I seem to be more enthusiastic about making a warm meal when it is cold. Winter is definitely an appetiser all on its own. I thought I would share an old family recipe which is really basic and economical to make. It’s both comforting and filling and you don’t need many ingredients. If you have a fire lit to keep your warm, you could make this in a potjie pot and save electricity. The iron from the pot will be good too.

Our photographer is on leave, so photos for new products are taking longer than expected. We are finding a temporary solution and listing new products regardless. With every new product sourced, we evaluate the packaging the product comes in and ask the following questions: Is the packaging re-usable? Will it compost or end up in a landfill or, worse yet, as litter somewhere? Can we supply this product with zero waste? This involves research, negotiations and sometimes we have to meet our suppliers halfway. We have had a few requests about supplying tofu and we would really like to make some seitan products and vegan cheeses available. However, the only packaging that seems to work is plastic vacuum packaging. As we are still an online store and don’t have the benefit of supplying fresh produce in a store at the moment, this packaging seems like the only practical option we have. We are always keeping an ear close to the ground for new developments and availability of more sustainable options in Cape Town, and our hearts and minds are open to new ideas and options to make ethical food and products easily available to you. We want to meet the needs of you, our customer, and still maintain a deep respect for the environment. After all, the environment is not just the planet, but us and every living being in it.

So we are in a catch 22. We may have to supply some products in  their vacuum packaging, but we will ensure that all this packaging is at the very least recyclable. Recyclable products aren’t the most ideal solution as it still takes a lot of energy to convert the product into something else rather than sterilising it and reusing it. However, as soon as better options become available, we will embrace them.

You can now buy soy mince, vegan marshmallows, walnut oil, virgin olive oil, canola oil, coconut oil, and environmentally friendly biodegradable toothbrushes from our online store.

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GARDENING TIPS FOR JUNE

It is the time to plant:

– Broad Beans seeds
– Cauliflower seeds
– Celery seeds
-Mint seeds
Mizuna seedlings
– Mustard greens seeds
– Onion seedlings
– Pak Choy seedlings
– Peas
– Potatos
– Radish seeds
-Rosemary seedlings
– Shallot seedlings
– Swedes/Rutabagas seeds
– Turnip seeds

We recommend starting a gardening diary or, better yet, a gardening calendar. This will help you keep track of what you planted where. You can add notes on whether your veggies are doing well or whether they aren’t doing so well, and why. A calendar can also be used to indicate when it’s time to pull veggies out the ground, or when to harvest them.

You can also add moon phases, mark which spots receive morning sun, which receive afternoon sun, which are the sunniest spots, and which  spots have the most shade. Gardening is something learnt over time through experience, and this is a great way to track your performance and record your triumphs.

There is not much to plant in June, so it is a good time to clean, sharpen and repair garden tools.

You can also construct permanent cropping beds and make a cold frame or two. This allows early sowing and planting to occur in a more sheltered environment

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EACH ONE TEACH ONE

 

EACH ONE TEACH ONE

We often think about how to make the world a better place. In order to create more harmony, humans need to change. We try to change policies, demand justice, and spread ideas. Some people sign petitions, others volunteer their time to non-profit organisations or for things like a beach or river clean-up. Some donate money to worthy causes.

But one powerful tool to change the way people think, is to educate others.

Each One Teach One is an African-American proverb. It was during slavery in the United States, when Africans were denied education, that this phrase originated. Many slaves were kept in a state of ignorance about the their immediate circumstances and when one enslaved person learnt how to read, it was his or her duty to teach someone else. This is how the phrase came about.

Each One Teach One was used with political prisoners in the apartheid era and is one of the guiding principles in one of the largest events in South Africa, Afrikaburn.

The Each One Teach One principle is also a fantastic way to raise awareness of environmental issues. Recently, the Animal Planet channel on DSTV aired an interesting programme with the title Racing Extinction. It delivered a lot of information, but what was truly inspiring was how a team of people that included National Geographic photographers set out to educate people who were largely responsible for a mass decline in a certain species. They created a beautiful movie showing the beauty and grace of this particular animal with a simple message, and they shared this with the villagers and their children. They also showed how a few people could change the way a community supports itself. Instead of hunting a species for consumption, as was done previously, these fishing boats now take people out to see them in their natural habitat. “My goal is to make a film that doesn’t just create awareness, but inspires people to get motivated to change this insane path we’re on.”- Louie Pslhoyos – Photographer and documentary film director

We did some research and found some brilliant teaching tips:

DESIRE – INTEREST AND EXPLANATION
You can lose your audience’s attention if you begin the wrong way. When our interest in something is aroused, we enjoy applying our minds to it. Establish the relevance of the topic and construct explanations that enable others to understand what you are communicating. Explain how your topic will benefit your audience so that they can in some way own it and use it to make sense of the world around them. You will need to know what your audience knows already and build on that to convey your message.

EMPATHY
Help your audience feel that they can master the subject. A little bit of humility can go a long way in encouraging people to try something for themselves and succeeding.

ENHANCE THE SENSORY EXPERIENCE
Most people fall into three categories of learning: visual; audio and kinesthetic. The ideal learning environment is created when the audience sees, hears and feels the material themselves.

LEARN FROM YOUR AUDIENCE
A good communicator is open to change, constantly assessing the effects and modifying communication methods according to the evidence collected.

IT’S ALL IN THE DELIVERY
It’s not only about the content, but also how you deliver it. Being assertive from a position of power can put people off, and focusing on the positive is better than starting with doom and gloom.

We encourage you to go out and share your knowledge with others who can use it for the greater good. The media of today mainly focus on sensationalism and many environmental and other pertinent issues are ignored. We need to integrate and talk more. There are revolutions happening out there and you can join one or even start one. You are more powerful than you know.